Oily Wastes

CONTEXT 

Ship-related discharges of oil at sea may result from accidental spills or operational discharges. 

Ship operational discharges can be defined as the management and disposal of oily waste from machinery spaces. Although vessel operations inevitably generate a certain amount of wastes, including oily wastes, one of the objectives of Fednav's Environmental Policy is to minimize the generation of these wastes in the first place through effective maintenance of all equipment and machinery. Thereafter, any residual oily bilge water wastes and oily residue (sludge) must be properly handled.

Fednav has a zero-tolerance policy for intentional and illegal disposal of oil at sea. This commitment forms the basis of Fednav's policy regarding operational discharges of oily wastes.

POLICY

Owned vessels

1.  Fednav-owned vessels are required to strictly adhere to:

a.  International, national, and local requirements for the prevention of oil pollution from ships [1]

b.  All procedures are outlined by the vessels’ managers within their environmental management system, and more specifically procedures relating to bilge water and waste oil management

c.  The Shipping Federation of Canada’s Code of Best Practices for Managing Oily Water Waste in Ships’ Engine Rooms or equivalent and/or more stringent procedures

2.  At the time of joining a Fednav vessel, all officers and crew members are required to sign a declaration confirming their agreement with a statement made by the CEO of Fednav’s ship managers which states that all officers and crew observe full compliance with all pollution prevention regulations as a matter of corporate policy.

3.  Sludge oil is to be collected and properly disposed of through either onboard incineration (in accordance with local and international regulations) or landed ashore. Onboard incinerators must not be used in ports, harbours, or estuaries. 

4.  Necessary financial resources are dedicated to shore-based disposal of sludge or other oily waste. This will ensure that vessels do not hesitate to proceed with disposal ashore of these wastes whenever needed.

5.  All officers are to be provided with proper training in the operation of the oily water separator (OWS) and handling of oily wastes. Furthermore, environmental awareness training is to be provided for all crew members.

Time-chartered vessels

1.  Vessels time chartered to Fednav: Are expected to strictly comply with international, national, and local requirements for the prevention of oil pollution from ships[2]
Are asked to adhere to the Shipping Federation of Canada’s Code of Best Practices for Managing Oily Water Waste in Ships’ Engine Rooms or equivalent and/or more stringent procedures

2.  Pre-vetting system and Environmental, Quality, and Safety Inspection (EQSI): Ship vetting for time chartered tonnage is the process under which relevant information is reviewed in order to assess whether a ship should be acceptable for charter for Fednav[3].

In addition to the pre-vetting system, vessels under Fednav charter are regularly inspected by an independent third party and detailed inspection reports are provided to Fednav under an EQSI system[4]. Vessels of concern are inspected on a more regular basis and Fednav closely monitors the implementation of corrective measures by the owners[5].

The aim of the pre-vetting process and the subsequent EQSI system is to ensure as much as possible the quality of the chartered tonnage and thus assist in minimizing environmental threats in general, including the risks of oil pollution in particular.

 


[1] International, national, and local requirements are communicated to Fednav vessels through our ship managers and/or local ship agents. These include but are not limited to Annex 1 of the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL) and the Canadian Regulations for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships.

 

[2] International, national, and local requirements are communicated to Fednav’s vessels through our ship managers and/or local ship agents

[3]Information reviewed includes age of the vessel, classification society, past experience with owners and managers, previous port state records of the ship, etc.

[4] Fednav's EQSI extend to structural aspects (e.g., conditions of the hulls), communication procedures (e.g., emergency communication system), navigational issues (e.g., implementation of passage planning), as well as onboard systems, equipment, and procedures with regard to environmental protection, etc.

[5] Although Fednav has set up this inspection system to assist in ensuring the quality of vessels time chartered under its fleet, owners of these vessels remain responsible for navigation, crewing and compliance with international, national and local pollution prevention regulations.